Lessons in the "computers" Category

New cyber curriculum to be taught to British teens

Thousands of British teenagers are to be taught a new cyber curriculum. Training will be given in cyber security. The idea being, that it will help boost British defences against the rising threat of online hacking attacks.

The new cyber curriculum scheme is led by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). It is aimed at teenagers between 14 and 18 years of age. An initial target of 5,700 students will be selected for the scheme. Older teenagers will be allowed to join the scheme, if they meet the right criteria. A pilot launch will begin in September.

Windows 10

Microsoft has released details of its new operating system Windows 10 that will debut later on this year. It will replace Windows 8.1. The good thing is - it will be FREE!

Windows 10 will also be a free upgrade for the first year for users of Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone. By offering Windows 10 free for the first year is a huge incentive to kickstart its adoption.

The end of Windows XP

Most of us use a computer. Its operating system will probably be a Windows based system, a Mac or Linux system.

Those of you who use a Windows based system will know the good versions and the bad ones! In the old days we used Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000 and in 2001 onwards there was the highly popular Windows XP that is still used by many today. Later we saw Windows Vista, which was rapidly replaced by Windows 7. Now there is Windows 8. Many people prefer Windows 7 to Windows 8, as it is easier to use.

Category: Technology / Operating Systems / Windows XP

The link between Bletchley Park and Google

For nearly half a century Bletchley Park, a Victorian manor house near Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, lay neglected and unloved; its dilapidated buildings falling into disrepair. By the 90s, its boarded-up huts at its rear were due to be torn down. Yet for more than 50 years the house was shrouded under a veil of secrecy. Only during the last 20 years was its secret finally revealed. It was the place where the codes of the German Enigma machine were broken by a special-purpose codebreaking machine called Colossus.

The secret work at Bletchley Park had, it is believed, shortened the war by up to two years. However, the secrecy came at a cost. Britain lost out to the US in the development of computer technology. So what is the link between Bletchley Park and Google? Simple – there is a desire by some individuals at Google to nurture the past. In fact, Google is helping to spearhead a campaign to save Bletchley Park by restoring it to its former glory. Google has provided the money for the purchase of key papers and is backing the current appeal to restore the derelict block at Bletchley Park.

Category: History / Bletchley Park / Google