Lessons in the "grammar" Category

Grammar - Revise your symbols

Today, I thought it would be useful to revise some symbols. We sometimes use symbols in our writing e.g. we use @ for at in our e- mail addresses somewhere. On our keyboards we can use € for euro, ₤ for pound, and $ for dollar. We might even squeeze in a number (i.e. #) or shorten and to &. We also use % for percent and = for equals, also > for greater than and < for less than.

A star (asterisk) (i.e.*) is a reference mark used to indicate an explanatory sentence or paragraph at the bottom of a page. A * is also used to replace a letter or letters left out in swear words to avoid them becoming objectionable, yet conveying the same force meant by the speaker e.g. He replied, “Don't be such a b***** fool!” We can also use a * for example when talking about a 3* hotel. An asterisk is often used to mean multiply in programming languages.

Revise your punctuation - 2

Today we’ll look at some more English language punctuation marks.

Don’t confuse a dash (i.e.–) with a hyphen! (i.e.-) A dash is used to denote a sudden change in the construction or sentiment: e.g. “The heroes of the Great War – how we cherish them.” A dash is also used to replace the words: (that is, namely) e.g. He excelled in three sports – football, rugby, and cricket.

Revise your punctuation! - 1

Many students are good at reading articles in English but when it comes to punctuation in dictation (a listening, writing and spelling exercise) they sometimes run into problems.

While we use punctuation marks in written form we don’t often say them aloud. It is of course just a question of remembering them after learning them. The question is though how good are you at remembering them?

Even native English people forget their punctuation! So where should we start? We all hopefully know where a full stop (point, dot or period) (i.e. .) goes - at the end of a sentence! Probably a comma (i.e. ,), but let’s double-check everything.