Lessons in the "languages" Category

Why you need to speak more than one language!

Today, let’s focus on why you need to speak more than one language in the world today. The first part of the discussion focuses on the negative attitude and ignorance of many British people in Britain when it comes to speaking a second or third language. Frankly, most can’t communicate in another language. Most Brits can only speak English, as ‘English is the business language of the world so we don’t need to speak any other language except English!’

Category: Education / Languages / Business

UN says 2,500 languages face extinction

The United Nations cultural agency UNESCO says the world is in danger of losing 2,500 of the 6,900 languages spoken in the world today. In its latest edition of the ‘Atlas of the world’s languages in Danger’ the UN reports a multi-fold increase since the last atlas was compiled in 2001 when 900 languages were listed as threatened with extinction.

Today there are 199 languages in the world spoken by fewer than a dozen people. This includes Wichita, which is spoken by 10 people in the US state of Oklahoma, Gros Ventre, which is spoken by 10 elderly people in Montana, USA and Karaim, which has six speakers in Ukraine. The last four speakers of Lengilu talk among themselves in Indonesia. Only one native speaker of Livonian in Latvia remains alive.

Category: UNESCO / Languages / Countries

Cockney English

Today we will be looking at some Cockney English. What’s that I hear you ask? Well, it’s a form of spoken English that many traditional working class people spoke in the East End of London in places such as Bow, Stepney, Hackney, and Shoreditch Poplar.

So what is a Cockney? Well, a true Cockney is a person who was born within the sound of Bow Bells (St. Maryle- Bow church in Cheapside, in the city of London). However, the term is now loosely applied to those born outside this area, as long as they have a “Cockney” accent or a Cockney heritage.

These days the Cockney accent is heard less in Central London but is widely heard in outer London boroughs, the London suburbs and all across South East England including towns like Romford.

Category: London / Languages / Cockney

Cockney English

Today we will be looking at some Cockney English. What’s that I hear you ask? Well, it’s a form of spoken English that many traditional working class people spoke in the East End of London in places such as Bow, Stepney, Hackney, and Shoreditch Poplar.

So what is a Cockney? Well, a true Cockney is a person who was born within the sound of Bow Bells (St. Maryle- Bow church in Cheapside, in the city of London). However, the term is now loosely applied to those born outside this area, as long as they have a “Cockney” accent or a Cockney heritage.

These days the Cockney accent is heard less in Central London but is widely heard in outer London boroughs, the London suburbs and all across South East England including towns like Romford.

Category: London / Languages / Cockney

Studying English abroad

Many students want to learn English, as it is the business language of the world. One can blame the British Empire for that! Of course, there are 101 other languages out there to learn but where to learn English?

In England is the obvious answer! However, many students in non-English speaking countries enroll on local courses in their country. At each level - be they a beginner, pre-intermediate, intermediate, upper intermediate or advanced level they learn grammar, reading, writing, listening and speaking. Having a conversation in English is a vital part of the learning process.

Many students will probably be taught by a non-native speaker, as in some countries there is a shortage of native speakers. These teachers have themselves learnt English and are happy to pass their knowledge on to others. Some students however will get the opportunity to practice their English with a native English speaker.

Category: Languages / Studying a Language / English